Making your workouts more like CrossFit

img_0234Let me make this clear right from the start: I am not a CrossFitter, I do not workout at a “box,” and I have no intention of beginning either.

That being said, I am also not a CrossFit hater.

The issues I have with CrossFit stem from the quality – or lack thereof – of training and instruction at many CrossFit gyms. As a certified personal trainer, I question how often and quickly beginners are thrown into workouts featuring incredibly advanced moves, and as such, the injuries people I know personally have suffered in CrossFit workouts is alarming.

But the workouts themselves are legit – if you know what you’re doing and have properly progressed to doing them safely.

I recently listened to an interview with the CrossFit founder, Greg Glassman. During the interview, Glassman made the point that CrossFit workouts feature exercises that mimic the situations you’d find in everyday life. There are times in life where you have to lift something over your head, where you have to pull yourself up, where you have to toss something over your head.

On the flip side, when are you ever going to find yourself in everyday life needing to do lateral raises like you would in a typical bodybuilding workout with dumbbells at a gym (No slam on lateral raises, I still do them)?

That’s why CrossFit-style workouts are often referred to as functional fitness.

It’s because of this that about two months ago, I began adding a CrossFit-style workout to my weekly routine. I met with a friend who is a die-hard CrossFitter to show me some of their typical WODs (Workout of the Day) and also to make sure I was doing the movements properly. While I’ve lifted weights for a while now, power moves like the power clean, the thruster, the clean and jerk and the overhead squat had never really been a part of my workout regime.

I took that experience, did a little bit of research on my own, and came up with a few of my own WODs. Understand that these are not beginner workouts. Don’t do them if you haven’t properly worked your way up to these moves. If you need help, find a trainer to walk you through the moves.

I have found these workouts to be incredibly hard but also highly effective and enjoyable. They challenge you in ways that a traditional weightlifting workout doesn’t, primarily cardiovascularly. And, having recently gotten into competing in obstacle course racing like Warrior Dash and Spartan Race, I immediately saw the ways these types of workouts can help me in those events.

So, I will continue with CrossFit-style workouts, even though I’m not a CrossFitter. They provide diversity and balance to my workout, and I’m not going to hate on that.

Here are two CrossFit-style workouts I came up with:

CrossFit-style workout #1 – No rest in between rounds; 2 minutes of rest in between supersets

  • Superset 1 – 4 rounds
    • 10 Thrusters
    • 10 Kettlebell swings
    • 30 Battle ropes
  • Superset 2 – 4 rounds
    • 10 Wall balls
    • 10 Deadlifts
    • 10 Burpees
  • Superset 3 – 4 rounds
    • 10 Overhead squats
    • 10 Hanging leg raises
    • 10 Box jumps

CrossFit-style workout #2 – No rest in between rounds; 2 minutes of rest in between supersets

  • Superset 1 – 4 rounds
    • 10 Power cleans
    • 10 Pull-ups
  • Superset 2 – 4 rounds
    • 10 Sumo deadlifts
    • 10 Kettlebell swings
  • Superset 3 – 4 rounds
    • 10 Wall balls
    • 10 Hanging leg raises
  • Superset 4 – 4 rounds
    • 10 Dumbbell squat presses
    • 10 Burpees
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12 thoughts on “Making your workouts more like CrossFit

    1. Sorry to intrude on your comment here. I was just wondering about your training as a CrossFitter. I want to take the Level 1 qualification, but like you – I don’t have a box. Is the training aimed at people who are already coaches?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hola Hello! I think the answer is Yes and No, if its aimed at coaches. To be a good Crossfit Training you need more knowleadge that just a level 1 course I think. What would be your reason for completing the course?

        Liked by 1 person

  1. The key as you said is that guidance and slowly progressing moves. My box was excellent. I started in April ’16 and was using a pvc pipe to perform cleans and snatches etc until my technique was down. It gets a bad rep but you aren’t likely to get injuries if you are in a good box with good coaches

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Agreed. I have received lots of coaching on form and technique, and think that this CrossFit is dangerous thing is just a misconception from people online who don’t actually go to a box with qualified instructors.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Great post man! I’m not a “CrossFitter” either, but can appreciate the strength and stamina it takes to complete the WOD’s. Unfortunately it gets a bad rep from most bodybuilders because it’s “dangerous”. But if a person takes the time to learn proper technique before doing the workouts (which can also be tailored with lower weights and added assistance), they are very beneficial.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yeah, doing reps for time is a problem. It causes you to lose focus on your form, and that’s where injuries happen. For me, as a personal trainer, I would never instruct a client to deadlift for time, for example. It’s just not safe.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I have only been doing Crossfit and weight training since April…. I definitely agree there is a huge potential for injury with Crossfit, however, combining weight lifting with speed is INCREDIBLY efficient for burning fat and building muscle simultaneously. I’ve been amazed at the progress I have made in such a short time. Excellent, concise post on the topic.

    Like

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